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Lindbergh: Reeve Lindbergh - about the lonely flight over the ocean (00:02:58)
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Title:

Lindbergh: Reeve Lindbergh - about the lonely flight over the ocean

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Location and time:

United States, 1999

Description:

Reeve Lindbergh: Reeve Lindbergh - about the lonely flight over the ocean is the daughter of world-renowned aviator Charles Lindbergh and his wife, the talented writer Anne Morrow Lindbergh.
Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (nicknamed "Slim," "Lucky Lindy" and "The Lone Eagle") was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and social activist.
Lindbergh, then a 25-year-old U.S. Air Mail pilot, emerged from virtual obscurity to almost instantaneous world fame as the result of his Orteig Prize-winning solo non-stop flight on May 20–21, 1927, from Roosevelt Field located in Garden City on New York's Long Island to Le Bourget Field in Paris, France, a distance of nearly 3,600 statute miles (5,800 km), in the single-seat, single-engine monoplane Spirit of St. Louis. Lindbergh, a U.S. Army reserve officer, was also awarded the nation's highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his historic exploit.
In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Lindbergh relentlessly used his fame to help promote the rapid development of U.S. commercial aviation. In March 1932, however, his infant son, Charles, Jr., was kidnapped and murdered in what was soon dubbed the "Crime of the Century" which eventually led to the Lindbergh family fleeing the United States in December 1935 to live in Europe where they remained until the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor by the Imperial Japanese Navy. Before the United States formally entered World War II by declaring war on Japan on December 8, 1941, Lindbergh had been an outspoken advocate of keeping the U.S. out of the world conflict, as was his Congressman father, Charles August Lindbergh (R-MN), during World War I, and became a leader of the anti-war America First movement. Nonetheless, he supported the war effort after Pearl Harbor and flew many combat missions in the Pacific Theater of World War II as a civilian consultant, even though President Franklin D. Roosevelt had refused to reinstate his Army Air Corps colonel's commission that he had resigned in April 1941.
In his later years, Lindbergh became a prolific prize-winning author, international explorer, inventor, and environmentalist.


The kidnapping of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., was the abduction of the son of aviator Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The toddler, 20 months old at the time, was abducted from his family home in East Amwell, New Jersey, near the town of Hopewell, New Jersey, on the evening of March 1, 1932. Over two months later, on May 12, 1932, his body was discovered a short distance from the Lindberghs' home. A medical examination determined that the cause of death was a massive skull fracture.
After an investigation that lasted more than two years, Bruno Richard Hauptmann was arrested and charged with the crime. In a trial that was held from January 2 to February 13, 1935, Hauptmann was found guilty of murder in the first degree and sentenced to death. He was executed by electric chair at the New Jersey State Prison on April 3, 1936, at 8:44 in the evening. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence to the end.
Newspaper writer H. L. Mencken called the kidnapping and subsequent trial "the biggest story since the Resurrection". The crime spurred Congress to pass the Federal Kidnapping Act, commonly called the "Lindbergh Law", which made transporting a kidnapping victim across state lines a federal crime.

Bruno Richard Hauptmann (November 26, 1899 – April 3, 1936) was a German ex-convict who was sentenced to death for the abduction and murder of the 20-month-old son of famous pilots Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The Lindbergh kidnapping became known as "The Crime of the Century."
 


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Romanian :

Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Reeve Lindbergh, Anne Morrow, Statele Unite ale Americii, 1999, interviu, celebru oameni, Famous, istorie, istoric, personalitate, cunoscute, important, trecut, trecut umane, timp, istoriei umane, aviaţie, zbor, aeronave, avion, avion, aerocarrier, zbura, răpire, Bruno Richard Hauptmann, proces, răpească-crimă, avocat, răpire, "Crima secolului", nevinovat, guvern, bebelus, ancheta, arestat, vinovat, crimă, Lindbergh Reeve - despre singur zbor peste ocean, ,


Slovak :

Charles Augustus Lindbergh Reeve Lindbergh Anne Morrow, Spojené štáty, 1999, rozhovor, slávnych ľudí, Slávni, História, historické osobnosti, známou, dôležitou, minulosti, ľudskej minulosti, čas, ľudskej histórie, letectva, letu, vzducholode, lietadlo, lietadlo, aerocarrier, lietať, únos, Bruno Richard Hauptmann, skúšobné, uniesť-vražda, advokát, únos, "zločin storočia", nevinné, vláda, batoľa, vyšetrovanie, zatknutý, vinný, vraždy, Lindbergh Reeve - o osamelé letu cez oceán, ,


Produced

1999

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SD
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4:3
Original video: This ist the original video - with voice over (English)
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ID Nr.:

11509_11501

Uploaded:

06-05-2011 15:51:51

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