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Aqua fitness under the water
02:37
SD RM master

Worldwide

Aqua fitness under the water

Aqua fitness under the water


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Berlin, 1920's: swimming men in river Spree
00:27
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: swimming men in river Spree

Berlin, 1920's: swimming men in river Spree In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


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Berlin, 1920's: a boxer is training in the gym
00:13
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: a boxer is training in the gym

Berlin, 1920's: a boxer is training in the gym In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


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Berlin, 1920's: man playing tennis
00:19
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: man playing tennis

Berlin, 1920's: playing tennis In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


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Bulgarian riviera: Sunny beach - cityscape
04:00
SD RM master

Bulgaria, Sunny beach

Bulgarian riviera: Sunny beach - cityscape

Bulgarian riviera: Sunny beach - cityscape Sunny Beach (Bulgarian: Слънчев бряг, Slanchev Briag; Slanchev Bryag; Slunchev Briag; Slunchev Bryag; SB Dutch: Zonnestrand; German: Sonnenstrand; Russian: Солнечный берег, Solnechniy bereg) is a major seaside resort on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, located approximately 35 km north of Burgas in Nessebar municipality, Burgas Province. It is the biggest and most popular holiday resort in Bulgaria, and is home to over 800 hotels with more than 300 000 beds. There are also 130 restaurants and numerous live music bars, pubs, nightclubs, discos, cafes. It has been undergoing continuous expansion for many years. In recent years almost the whole hotel base has been renovated and several new luxurious hotels have been built as well as many apartment complexes. It is widely believed in Bulgaria that Sunny Beach was heavily overdeveloped in the 2000s to the detriment of its greenery, former serenity, safety, and the quality of public services. Sunny Beach has a very small permanent population, but during the summer the resort is home to many thousands of tourists. The main strip of high-rise hotels backing onto the beach is several kilometers long and extends along a wide bay between Sveti Vlas and Nessebar. The resort's construction began back in Communist times, in 1958. Construction works began at a site, where two old wells supplying Nessebar with water in ancient times and during the Middle Ages, had been located. The climate of the area is Mediterranean, explaining Sunny Beach's popularity with tourists since the Soviet Union existed. Since that time the resort's popularity has grown among German holidaymakers, who add to the already large numbers of Russian visitors. More recently, Sunny Beach has begun to attract the attention of the British, Irish, Scandinavian and Dutch for which it is a more affordable alternative to the established Mediterranean resorts. Attractions for tourists include the sunning at the beach, water sports, nightlife, and the nearby historical site of Nessebar. There are two new Aqua Parks near the resort. Sunny Beach is mainly popular amongst young people. The Golden Orpheus International Festival of Popular Song, the Decade of Symphonic Music, part of the International Folklore Festival, fashion-shows and various beach competitions are held there. In 2008, the VIth Stranski-Kaischew Surface Science Workshop, a prestigious triennial international conference sponsored by the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and named in honor of two prominent Bulgarian scientists of the 20th century, was held in Sunny Beach.


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Corfu: Dassia - cityscape
01:48
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Dassia - cityscape

Corfu: Dassia - cityscape Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Sidari - landscape, cliffs
03:11
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Sidari - landscape, cliffs

Corfu: Sidari - landscape, cliffs Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Paleokastritsa - landscape, church inside
03:42
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Paleokastritsa - landscape, church inside

Corfu: Paleokastritsa - landscape, church inside Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Kalami - landscape, cityscape
03:26
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Kalami - landscape, cityscape

Corfu: Kalami - landscape, cityscape Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Glifada - landscape, beach
02:38
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Glifada - landscape, beach

Corfu: Glifada - landscape, beach Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Benitses - landscape, port
01:19
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Benitses - landscape, port

Corfu: Benitses - landscape, port Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: aqualand - bather people
01:06
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: aqualand - bather people

Corfu: aqualand - bather people Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Lake Korission - landscape, beach
02:19
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Lake Korission - landscape, beach

Corfu: Lake Korission - landscape, beach Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Corfu: Messongi - Beach, bather people
01:46
SD RM master

Greece, Corfu

Corfu: Messongi - Beach, bather people

Corfu: Messongi - Beach, bather people Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands. Its northern part lies off the coast of Sarandë, Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near ancient Butrint, while its southern part lies off the coast of Thesprotia, Greece. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and communities of Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Municipality of Paxoi, which are all separate islands. The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. The island is connected to the history of Greece from the beginning of Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra or Korkyra, is related to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea, and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her. Poseidon brought Metope to the hitherto unnamed island and, in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra (Doric). Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes. This term was transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians.


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Croatia: Plitvice Lakes National Park
01:57
SD RM master

Croatia, Plitvice

Croatia: Plitvice Lakes National Park

Croatia: Plitvice Lakes National Park The lakes are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae, and bacteria. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm per year. The sixteen lakes are separated into an upper and lower cluster formed by runoff from the mountains, descending from an altitude of 636 to 503 m (2,087 to 1,650 ft) over a distance of some eight km, aligned in a south-north direction. The lakes collectively cover an area of about two km², with the water exiting from the lowest lake to form the Korana River. The lakes are renowned for their distinctive colours, ranging from azure to green, grey or blue. The colors change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight. The lakes are divided into the 12 Upper Lakes (Gornja jezera) and the four Lower Lakes. Plitvice Lakes National Park lies in the Plitvice plateau which is surrounded by three mountains part of the Dinaric Alps: Plješevica mountain (Gornja Plješevica peak 1,640 m), Mala Kapela mountain (Seliški Vrh peak at 1,280 m), and Medveđak (884 m).[1] The national Park is underlain by karstic rock, mainly dolomite and limestone with associated lakes and caves, this has given rise to the most distinctive feature of the lakes.


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Diabetes: the insidious killer
05:03
SD RM English

worldwide

Diabetes: the insidious killer

Diabetes is a chronic disease of the metabolic system of the body. Among the main symptoms are the increased occurance of sugar in the urine and the increased need to urinate. In the Middle Ages diabetes was diagnosed by tasting the urine for sweetness. The cause of the disease is the lack of the hormone insulin or the body's insulin insensitivity, or both. The fourteenth of November, is World Diabetes Day, focusing our attention on this disease and the prevention of it.


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Diabetes: the insidious killer
05:03
SD RM master

worldwide

Diabetes: the insidious killer

Diabetes is a chronic disease of the metabolic system of the body. Among the main symptoms are the increased occurance of sugar in the urine and the increased need to urinate. In the Middle Ages diabetes was diagnosed by tasting the urine for sweetness. The cause of the disease is the lack of the hormone insulin or the body's insulin insensitivity, or both. The fourteenth of November, is World Diabetes Day, focusing our attention on this disease and the prevention of it.


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Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor arm wrestling training
01:28
SD RM master

Hungary

Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor arm wrestling training

Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor arm wrestling training Arm wrestling is a sport with two participants. Each participant places one arm, both put either the right or left, on a surface, with their elbows bent and touching the surface, and they grip each other's hand. The goal is to pin the other's arm onto the surface, with the winner's arm over the loser's arm. Various factors can play a part in one's success in arm wrestling. Technique and overall arm strength are the two greatest contributing factors to winning an arm wrestling match. Other factors such as the length of an arm wrestler's arm, his/her muscle and arm mass/density, hand grip size, wrist endurance and flexibility, reaction time, as well as countless other traits, can add to the advantages of one arm wrestler over another[citation needed]. It is sometimes used to prove who is stronger between two or more people. In competitive arm wrestling, as sanctioned by the United States Armwrestling Federation (USAF), arm wrestling is performed with both competitors standing up with their arms placed on a tournament arm wrestling table[citation needed]. Arm wrestling tournaments are also divided into weight classes as well as left and right-handed divisions. Furthermore, strict rules such as fouls given to penalties (such as the competitor's elbow leaving a matted area where the elbow is to remain at all times, or a false start), and trying to escape a possible arm pin by breaking the grip with the opponent may result in a loss at the table[citation needed]. Paraphrasing USAF rules, arm wrestlers must straighten their wrists without a time lapse of one minute during competition. The World Armwrestling Federation (WAF) is the universally recognized global governing body of amateur arm wrestling and comprises more than 85 member countries.[citation needed] Some noted top arm wrestling competitors include John Brzenk (hailed as the greatest arm wrestler of all time), Alexey Voevoda and Jerry Cadorette. Allen Fisher is of high acclaim, for he has won 25 world championships[citation needed]. He is one of the oldest current arm wrestlers at 53 years of age.


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Disabled people: powerlifting with János Szabó Ozor
03:05
SD RM master

Hungary

Disabled people: powerlifting with János Szabó Ozor

Disabled people: powerlifting with János Szabó Ozor


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Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor and his friends are training
01:52
SD RM master

Hungary

Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor and his friends are training

Disabled people: János Szabó Ozor and his friends are training


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