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1993 - The UN flees Somalia
08:26
SD RM English

Somalia

1993 - The UN flees Somalia

United Nations Operation in Somalia II (UNOSOM II) was the second phase of the United Nations intervention in Somalia, from March 1993 until March 1995. UNOSOM II carried on from the United States-controlled (but UN-sanctioned) Unified Task Force (UNITAF), which had in turn taken over from the ineffectual United Nations Operation in Somalia I (UNOSOM I) mission. All three of these interventions were aimed at creating a secure enough environment for humanitarian operations to be carried out in the increasingly lawless and famine-stricken country. The UNOSOM II intervention is well-known for the Battle of Mogadishu and the resulting events portrayed in the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, and its associated film Black Hawk Down.   On October 3, 1993, Task Force Ranger raided a hotel in Mogadishu in which Aidid was thought to be hiding. What ensued was the longest, bloodiest and deadliest battle for US troops in Somalia. In what later became known as the Battle of Mogadishu, eighteen US soldiers were killed. Images of their dead bodies being dragged through the streets were broadcast on television stations all over the world, horrifying and infuriating the American public.


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1993 - The UN flees Somalia
08:26
SD RM master

Somalia

1993 - The UN flees Somalia

United Nations Operation in Somalia II (UNOSOM II) was the second phase of the United Nations intervention in Somalia, from March 1993 until March 1995. UNOSOM II carried on from the United States-controlled (but UN-sanctioned) Unified Task Force (UNITAF), which had in turn taken over from the ineffectual United Nations Operation in Somalia I (UNOSOM I) mission. All three of these interventions were aimed at creating a secure enough environment for humanitarian operations to be carried out in the increasingly lawless and famine-stricken country. The UNOSOM II intervention is well-known for the Battle of Mogadishu and the resulting events portrayed in the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, and its associated film Black Hawk Down.   On October 3, 1993, Task Force Ranger raided a hotel in Mogadishu in which Aidid was thought to be hiding. What ensued was the longest, bloodiest and deadliest battle for US troops in Somalia. In what later became known as the Battle of Mogadishu, eighteen US soldiers were killed. Images of their dead bodies being dragged through the streets were broadcast on television stations all over the world, horrifying and infuriating the American public.


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1993 - The UN flees Somalia: U.S Air Force - aircraft repair, shipment of aid
06:54
SD RM master

Somalia, Mogadisu

1993 - The UN flees Somalia: U.S Air Force - aircraft repair, shipment of aid

Somalia, formerly known as the Somali Democratic Republic, is a coastal nation in East Africa . It currently exists solely in a de jure capacity, which can be described as anarchy. Somalia has no recognized central government authority, no national currency, nor any other feature associated with a remotely-established nation state. De facto authority resides in the hands of the governments for the unrecognized entities of Somaliland , Puntland, and other small rival warlords. Intermittent civil war has been a fact of life in Somalia since 1977. In 1991, the northern portion of the country declared its independence as Somaliland ; although de facto independent and relatively stable compared to the tumultuous south, it has not been recognized by any foreign government. Beginning in 1993, a two-year UN humanitarian effort (primarily in the south) was able to alleviate famine conditions, but when the UN withdrew on March 3, 1995, having suffered significant casualties, order had still not been restored. Yet again another secession from Somalia took place in the northeastern region. The self-proclaimed state took the name Puntland after declaring "temporary" independence in 1998, with the intention that it would participate in any Somali reconciliation to form a new central government.


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1993 - The UN flees Somalia: U.S Air Force - starving people - aid, aid distribution - refugees, children
11:59
SD RM master

Somalia, Mogadisu

1993 - The UN flees Somalia: U.S Air Force - starving people - aid, aid distribution - refugees, children

Somalia, formerly known as the Somali Democratic Republic, is a coastal nation in East Africa . It currently exists solely in a de jure capacity, which can be described as anarchy. Somalia has no recognized central government authority, no national currency, nor any other feature associated with a remotely-established nation state. De facto authority resides in the hands of the governments for the unrecognized entities of Somaliland , Puntland, and other small rival warlords. Intermittent civil war has been a fact of life in Somalia since 1977. In 1991, the northern portion of the country declared its independence as Somaliland ; although de facto independent and relatively stable compared to the tumultuous south, it has not been recognized by any foreign government. Beginning in 1993, a two-year UN humanitarian effort (primarily in the south) was able to alleviate famine conditions, but when the UN withdrew on March 3, 1995, having suffered significant casualties, order had still not been restored. Yet again another secession from Somalia took place in the northeastern region. The self-proclaimed state took the name Puntland after declaring "temporary" independence in 1998, with the intention that it would participate in any Somali reconciliation to form a new central government.


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1993 - The UN flees Somalia
09:15
SD RM German

Somalia

1993 - The UN flees Somalia

United Nations Operation in Somalia II (UNOSOM II) was the second phase of the United Nations intervention in Somalia, from March 1993 until March 1995. UNOSOM II carried on from the United States-controlled (but UN-sanctioned) Unified Task Force (UNITAF), which had in turn taken over from the ineffectual United Nations Operation in Somalia I (UNOSOM I) mission. All three of these interventions were aimed at creating a secure enough environment for humanitarian operations to be carried out in the increasingly lawless and famine-stricken country. The UNOSOM II intervention is well-known for the Battle of Mogadishu and the resulting events portrayed in the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, and its associated film Black Hawk Down.   On October 3, 1993, Task Force Ranger raided a hotel in Mogadishu in which Aidid was thought to be hiding. What ensued was the longest, bloodiest and deadliest battle for US troops in Somalia. In what later became known as the Battle of Mogadishu, eighteen US soldiers were killed. Images of their dead bodies being dragged through the streets were broadcast on television stations all over the world, horrifying and infuriating the American public.


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Armenian Genocide: train, refugees, children, dead
00:10
SD RM

Armenia

Armenian Genocide: train, refugees, children, dead

Armenian Genocide: train, refugees, children, dead


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Assassination of Möll: terror against foreigners
00:40
SD RM master

Germany, Möll

Assassination of Möll: terror against foreigners

Assassination of Möll: terror against foreigners


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Balkan war: Turkish refugees and retreating soldiers
02:24
SD RM

Turkey, Constantinople

Balkan war: Turkish refugees and retreating soldiers

Balkan war: Turkish refugees and retreating soldiers The First Balkan War, which lasted from October 1912 to May 1913, pitted the Balkan League (Serbia, Greece, Montenegro and Bulgaria) against the Ottoman Empire. The combined armies of the Balkan states overcame the numerically inferior and strategically disadvantaged Ottoman armies, and achieved rapid success. As a result of the war, almost all remaining European territories of the Ottoman Empire were captured and partitioned among the allies. Ensuing events also led to the creation of an independent Albanian state. Despite its success, Bulgaria was dissatisfied with the peace settlement and with the Ottoman threat gone, soon started a Second Balkan War against its former allies.


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Bergen-Belsen: Concentration Camp - Camp for Jewish refugees after World War II.
00:25
SD RM

Germany, Bergen-Belsen

Bergen-Belsen: Concentration Camp - Camp for Jewish refugees after World War II.

Germany: Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp - Camp for Jewish refugees after wolrd war II. - English Zone Bergen-Belsen (or Belsen) was a German Nazi concentration camp in Lower Saxony in northwestern Germany, southwest of the town of Bergen near Celle. Originally established as the prisoner of war camp Stalag XI-C, in 1943 it became a concentration camp on the orders of Heinrich Himmler, where Jewish hostages were held with the intention of exchanging them for German prisoners of war held overseas[1]. Later still the name was applied to the displaced persons camp established nearby, but it is most commonly associated with the concentration camp it became as conditions deteriorated between 1943-1945. During this time an estimated 50,000 Russian prisoners of war and a further 50,000 inmates died there,[2] up to 35,000 of them dying of typhus in the first few months of 1945.[3] The camp was liberated on April 15, 1945 by the British 11th Armoured Division.[4] 60,000 prisoners were found inside, most of them seriously ill,[3] and another 13,000 corpses lay around the camp unburied.[4] The scenes that greeted British troops were described by the BBC's Richard Dimbleby, who accompanied them: “ ...Here over an acre of ground lay dead and dying people. You could not see which was which... The living lay with their heads against the corpses and around them moved the awful, ghostly procession of emaciated, aimless people, with nothing to do and with no hope of life, unable to move out of your way, unable to look at the terrible sights around them ... Babies had been born here, tiny wizened things that could not live ... A mother, driven mad, screamed at a British sentry to give her milk for her child, and thrust the tiny mite into his arms, then ran off, crying terribly. He opened the bundle and found the baby had been dead for days. "This day at Belsen was the most horrible of my life.[5] ” "I could not believe the horror of these camps," said one liberator. "We found piles of bodies in train cars that had been dead for days."


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Bergen-Belsen: Camp for Jewish refugees after World War II. - working people
00:27
SD RM

Germany, Bergen-Belsen

Bergen-Belsen: Camp for Jewish refugees after World War II. - working people

Germany: Bergen-Belsen - Camp for Jewish refugees after Wolrd War II. - working people 1946: 100 thousand Jews lived in the camp An introduction to the events that led to the creation of Israel, the Jewish state, in 1948 Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל‎, Yisrā'el; Arabic: إِسْرَائِيلُ‎, Isrā'īl), officially the State of Israel (Hebrew: About this sound מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (help·info), Medīnat Yisrā'el; Arabic: دَوْلَةُ إِسْرَائِيلَ‎, Dawlat Isrā'īl), is a parliamentary republic in the Middle East located on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It borders Lebanon in the north, Syria in the northeast, Jordan and the West Bank in the east, the Gaza Strip and Egypt on the southwest, and contains geographically diverse features within its relatively small area. Israel is the world's only predominantly Jewish state, with a population estimated in May 2010 to be 7,602,400 people, of whom 6,051,000 are Jews. Arab citizens of Israel form the country's second-largest ethnic group, which includes Muslims, Christians, Druze, and Samaritans. According to the May 2010 population estimate, including 300,000 non-citizen Arabs living in East Jerusalem, this minority numbers 1,551,400. The modern State of Israel traces its historical and religious roots to the Biblical Land of Israel, also known as Zion, a concept central to Judaism since ancient times. Political Zionism took shape in the late-19th century under Theodor Herzl, and the Balfour Declaration of 1917 formalized British policy preferring the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people. Following World War I, the League of Nations granted Great Britain the Mandate for Palestine, which included responsibility for securing "the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people". In November 1947, the United Nations voted in favor of the partition of Palestine, proposing the creation of a Jewish state, an Arab state, and a UN-administered Jerusalem.Partition was accepted by Zionist leaders but rejected by Arab leaders, leading to civil war. Israel declared independence on 14 May 1948 and neighboring Arab states attacked the next day. Since then, Israel has fought a series of wars with neighboring Arab states, and in consequence occupied territories, including the West Bank, Sinai Peninsula, Gaza Strip and the Golan Heights, beyond those delineated in the 1949 Armistice Agreements. Israel has signed peace treaties with Egypt and Jordan, but efforts by elements within both parties to diplomatically solve the problem have so far only met with limited success and some of Israel's international borders remain in dispute. Israel is a developed country and a representative democracy with a parliamentary system and universal suffrage. The Prime Minister serves as head of government and the Knesset serves as Israel's legislative body. The economy, based on the nominal gross domestic product, was the 41st-largest in the world in 2008. Israel ranks highest among Middle Eastern countries on the UN Human Development Index, and it has one of the highest life expectancies in the world.Jerusalem is the country's capital, although it is not recognized internationally as such.[a] Israel's main financial center is Tel Aviv, and its main industrial center is Haifa. In 2010, Israel joined the OECD.


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Berlin Wall: Checkpoint Charlie - GDR soldiers arrested a refugee
00:57
SD RM master

East Germany, East Berlin

Berlin Wall: Checkpoint Charlie - GDR soldiers arrested a refugee

The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a barrier constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Soviet-dominated Eastern Bloc officially claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a Socialist State in East Germany. However, in practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period. The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Wall" (German: Antifaschistischer Schutzmauer) by GDR authorities, implying that neighbouring West Germany had not been fully de-Nazified. The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame" – a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt – while condemning the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border (IGB) that demarcated the border between East and West Germany, both borders came to symbolize the "Iron Curtain" between Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc. Before the Wall's erection, 3.5 million East Germans circumvented Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and defected from the GDR, many by crossing over the border from East Berlin into West Berlin, from where they could then travel to West Germany and other Western European countries. Between 1961 and 1989, the wall prevented almost all such emigration.[3] During this period, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with estimates of the resulting death toll varying between 100 and 200. In 1989, a radical series of Eastern Bloc political changes occurred, associated with the liberalization of the Eastern Bloc's authoritarian systems and the erosion of political power in the pro-Soviet governments in nearby Poland and Hungary. After several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on 9 November 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, a euphoric public and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of the rest. The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on 3 October 1990.


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Berlin Wall: fleeing across the border, refugees
00:11
SD RM

East-Germany, East-Berlin

Berlin Wall: fleeing across the border, refugees

Berlin Wall: fleeing across the border, refugees


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Berlin Wall: People jumping out of window, germans crossing a barbed wire fence to escape
00:28
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin Wall: People jumping out of window, germans crossing a barbed wire fence to escape

Berlin Wall: People jumping out of window, germans crossing a barbed wire fence to escape


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Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border
06:09
SD RM master

Austria, Hungary

Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border

Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border


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Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border
06:09
SD RM English

Austria, Hungary

Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border

Border: refugees in the Austrian-Hungarian border


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Chinese refugees: Children running on hill-side and traveling by bus
00:07
SD RM

China

Chinese refugees: Children running on hill-side and traveling by bus

Chinese refugees: Children running on hill-side and traveling by bus


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Chinese refugees: Men pulling packed rickshaws, women and elder children carrying kids, people with baskets, fleeing
00:07
SD RM

China

Chinese refugees: Men pulling packed rickshaws, women and elder children carrying kids, people with baskets, fleeing

Chinese refugees: Men pulling packed rickshaws, women and elder children carrying kids, people with baskets, fleeing


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Concentration camp: the liberation of Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp
01:59
SD RM

Poland, Auschwitz

Concentration camp: the liberation of Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp

Concentration camp: the liberation of Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp


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Croatia: Serbian concentration camp
01:39
SD RM

Yugoslavia, Croatia

Croatia: Serbian concentration camp

Croatia: Serbian concentration camp Vukorvar


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Cuban refugees: Cuban refugee getting into ship
00:12
SD RM

Unknown

Cuban refugees: Cuban refugee getting into ship

Cuban refugees: Cuban refugee getting into ship


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