Facebook

art stock video footage

242 videos found

Sort by : title duration uploaded event date << >>
show footage per page
Alexander Mosaic: Roman floor mosaic originally from the House of the Faun in Pompeii, Alexander the Great,  Darius III of Persia, mosaic, details
00:58
SD RM

Italy, Naples

Alexander Mosaic: Roman floor mosaic originally from the House of the Faun in Pompeii, Alexander the Great, Darius III of Persia, mosaic, details

Alexander Mosaic: Roman floor mosaic originally from the House of the Faun in Pompeii, Alexander the Great, Darius III of Persia, mosaic, details


cart/download

André Gide: Smoking and speaking
00:10
SD RM master

Russia

André Gide: Smoking and speaking

André Gide: Smoking and speaking


cart/download

Antiquities: Handicraft articles for personal use of Vienna
00:24
SD RM

Austria, Vienna

Antiquities: Handicraft articles for personal use of Vienna

Antiquities: Handicraft articles for personal use of Vienna


cart/download

Arno Breker: Sculptor, exhibition, opening ceremony, horse, art, sculpture, statue, Nazi Germany, guest
00:24
SD RM

Germany

Arno Breker: Sculptor, exhibition, opening ceremony, horse, art, sculpture, statue, Nazi Germany, guest

Arno Breker: Sculptor, exhibition, opening ceremony, horse, art, sculpture, statue, Nazi Germany, guest


cart/download

Art
: Artists in the early 1900s in Munich
02:30
SD RM master

Germany, Munich

Art : Artists in the early 1900s in Munich

Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) was a group of artists from the Neue Künstlervereinigung München in Munich, Germany. Der Blaue Reiter was a German movement lasting from 1911 to 1914, fundamental to Expressionism, along with Die Brücke which was founded the previous decade in 1905.


cart/download

Art: German Fine Art, paintings of german mythology
00:40
SD RM

Germany

Art: German Fine Art, paintings of german mythology

Art: German Fine Art, paintings of german mythology


cart/download

Art: Experimental art
04:22
SD RM German

Worldwide

Art: Experimental art

Art: Experimental art


cart/download

Art: Artists in the early 1900s
03:56
SD RM German

Worldwide

Art: Artists in the early 1900s

Art : Artists in the early 1900s


cart/download

Augustus: Statue of emperor Augustus, Emperor of the Roman Empire
00:09
SD RM

Italy, Rome

Augustus: Statue of emperor Augustus, Emperor of the Roman Empire

Augustus: Statue of emperor Augustus, Emperor of the Roman Empire


cart/download

Austrian Parliament Building: The assembly hall
00:14
SD RM

Austria, Vienna

Austrian Parliament Building: The assembly hall

Austrian Parliament Building: The assembly hall


cart/download

Ballet: Anna Pavlova in the Fokine/Saint-Saëns, The Dying Swan
00:07
SD RM

United Kingdom

Ballet: Anna Pavlova in the Fokine/Saint-Saëns, The Dying Swan

Anna Pavlovna (Matveïevna) Pavlova (Russian: А́нна Па́вловна (Матве́евна) Па́влова) (12 February 1881 [O.S. 31 January]–23 January 1931) was a Russian ballerina of the late 19th and the early 20th century. She is widely regarded as one of the finest classical ballet dancers in history and was most noted as a principal artist of the Imperial Russian Ballet and the Ballets Russes of Serge Diaghilev. Pavlova is most recognised for the creation of the rôle The Dying Swan and, with her own company, would become the first ballerina to tour ballet around the world.


cart/download

Bavaria: Ludwig I - king of Bavaria portrait
00:07
SD RM

Germany, Bavaria

Bavaria: Ludwig I - king of Bavaria portrait

Ludwig I (25 August 1786 – 29 February 1868) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. Born in Strasbourg, he was the son of Count Palatine Maximilian Joseph of Zweibrücken by his first wife Augusta Wilhelmine of Hesse-Darmstadt. At the time of his birth, his father was an officer in the French army stationed at Strasbourg. He was the godson and namesake of Louis XVI of France. On 1 April 1795 his father succeeded Ludwig's uncle, Charles II, as duke of Zweibrücken, and on 16 February 1799 became Elector of Bavaria and Count Palatine of the Rhine, the Arch-Steward of the Empire, and Duke of Berg on the extinction of the Sulzbach line with the death of the elector Charles Theodore. His father assumed the title of King of Bavaria on 1 January 1806. Starting in 1803 Ludwig studied in Landshut where he was taught by Johann Michael Sailer and in Göttingen. In October 1810, he married Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen (1792–1854), the daughter of Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen. The wedding was the occasion of the first ever Oktoberfest. Ludwig strongly rejected the alliance of his father with Napoleon I of France but in spite of his anti-French politics the crown prince had to join the emperor's wars with allied Bavarian troops in 1806 and under François Joseph Lefebvre in 1809. In 1817 Ludwig was involved in the fall of Prime Minister Count Max Josef von Montgelas. He succeeded his father on the throne in 1825.


cart/download

Bavaria: Franz von Lenbach's paintings, portrait
00:16
SD RM

Germany, Bavaria

Bavaria: Franz von Lenbach's paintings, portrait

Lenbach was born at Schrobenhausen, in Bavaria. His father was a mason, and the boy was intended to follow his father's trade or be a builder. With this view he was sent to school at Landsberg, and then to the polytechnic at Augsburg. But after seeing Hofner, the animal painter, executing some studies, he made various attempts at painting, which his father's orders interrupted. However, when he had seen the galleries of Augsburg and Munich, he finally obtained his father's permission to become an artist, and worked for a short time in the studio of Gräfle, the painter; after this he devoted much time to copying. Thus he was already accomplished in technique when he became the pupil of Piloty, with whom he set out for Italy in 1858. A few interesting works remain as the outcome of this first journey A Peasant seeking Shelter from Bad Weather (1855), The Goatherd (1860, in the Schack Gallery, Munich) and The Arch of Titus (in the Palfy collection, Budapest). On returning to Munich, he was at once called to Weimar to take the appointment of professor at the Academy. But he did not hold it long, having made the acquaintance of Count Schack, who commissioned a great number of copies for his collection. Lenbach returned to Italy the same year, and there copied many famous pictures. He set out in 1867 for Spain, where he copied not only the famous pictures by Velázquez in the Prado, but also some landscapes in the museums of Granada and the Alhambra (1868). In the previous year he had exhibited at the great exhibition at Paris several portraits, one of which took a third-class medal. Thereafter he exhibited frequently both at Munich and at Vienna, and in 1900 at the Paris exhibition was awarded a Grand Prix for painting. Lenbach, who died in 1904, painted many of the most remarkable personages of his time.


cart/download

Bavaria: The dancers give a show
00:37
SD RM

Germany, Munich

Bavaria: The dancers give a show

The dancers give a show


cart/download

Benito Mussolini: Head statue of the Italian dictator
00:22
SD RM

Italy

Benito Mussolini: Head statue of the Italian dictator

Benito Mussolini: Head statue of the Italian dictator


cart/download

Berlin: Museum Island - Museumsinsel
01:56
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

Berlin: Museum Island - Museumsinsel

Berlin: Museumsinsel Museum Island (German: Museumsinsel) is the name of the northern half of an island in the Spree river in the central Mitte district of Berlin, Germany. It received its name for a complex of five internationally renowned museums that occupy the island's northern part: * The Altes Museum (Old Museum) completed on the orders of Karl Friedrich Schinkel in 1830. * The Neues Museum (New Museum) finished in 1859 according to plans by Friedrich August Stüler, a student of Schinkel. Destroyed in World War II, it was rebuilt under the direction of David Chipperfield for the Egyptian Museum of Berlin and re-opened in 2009. * The Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery) completed in 1876, also according to designs by Friedrich August Stüler, to host a collection of 19th century art donated by banker Joachim H. W. Wagener * The Bode Museum on the island's northern tip, opened in 1904 and then called Kaiser-Friedrich-Museum. It exhibits the sculpture collections and late Antique and Byzantine art. * The Pergamon Museum, the final museum of the complex, constructed in 1930. It contains multiple reconstructed immense and historically significant buildings such as the Pergamon Altar and the Ishtar Gate of Babylon. In 1999, the museum complex was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.


cart/download

Berlin, 1920's: painters and drawings from the twenties
02:00
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: painters and drawings from the twenties

In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


cart/download

Berlin, 1920's: Schall und Rauch Cabaret
01:06
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: Schall und Rauch Cabaret

In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


cart/download

Berlin, 1920's: theater and film shooting
01:58
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

Berlin, 1920's: theater and film shooting

Berlin, 1920's: paintings about the dramatics, actors In January 1919 the leftist Spartacus-rebellion is put down bloodily. Free corps troops abduct Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg on January 15th and kill them at the “Tiergarten”. On March 13, 1920 parts of the “Reichswehr” (empire’s army) overthrow their break-up as ordered by the “Versailler Vertrag” (Versaille agreement) and proclaim the rightist conservative Wolfgang Kapp imperial chancellor. A general strike organized by SPD and KPD leads to the collapse of the Kapp-Putsch. In October of 1920 7 cities, 59 country communities and 27 property districts are being suburbanized to Berlin by law and the city is divided into 20 districts. The population is now 3.8 million, the size 878 square kilometers. Berlin becomes Europe’s largest industrial city and turns out to be a cultural metropolis in the Twenties. Artists such as Otto Dix, Lionel Feininger, Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Zweig and Nobel Prize laureate Albert Einstein live and work in Berlin. In 1923 inflation is at its peak level. In 1924 the „1. Große Deutsche Funkausstellung“ (first big German radio exhibition) inaugurates on the fairgrounds. In 1926 the first “Grüne Woche”(agricultural exhibition) takes place. In August of 1928 the debut performance of “The Threepenny Opera” by B. Brecht occurs in the theater at the “Schiffbauerdamm”. About 150 daily and weekly papers are released in the city. The global economic crisis seizes Berlin in 1929. There are 450.000 people jobless in February.


cart/download

Bertolt Brecht: photo
00:08
SD RM

Germany

Bertolt Brecht: photo

Bertolt Brecht (German pronunciation: [ˈbɛɐ̯tɔlt ˈbʁɛçt] ( listen); born About this sound Eugen Berthold Friedrich Brecht (help·info); 10 February 1898 – 14 August 1956) was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director. An influential theatre practitioner of the 20th century, Brecht made equally significant contributions to dramaturgy and theatrical production, the latter particularly through the seismic impact of the tours undertaken by the Berliner Ensemble—the post-war theatre company operated by Brecht and his wife and long-time collaborator, the actress Helene Weigel—with its internationally acclaimed productions.[2] From his late twenties Brecht remained a life-long committed Marxist who, in developing the combined theory and practice of his 'epic theatre', synthesized and extended the experiments of Erwin Piscator and Vsevolod Meyerhold to explore the theatre as a forum for political ideas and the creation of a critical aesthetics of dialectical materialism. Brecht's modernist concern with drama-as-a-medium led to his refinement of the 'epic form' of the drama. This dramatic form is related to similar modernist innovations in other arts, including the strategy of divergent chapters in James Joyce's novel Ulysses, Sergei Eisenstein's evolution of a constructivist 'montage' in the cinema, and Picasso's introduction of cubist 'collage' in the visual arts.[3] In contrast to many other avant-garde approaches, however, Brecht had no desire to destroy art as an institution; rather, he hoped to 're-function' the theatre to a new social use. In this regard he was a vital participant in the aesthetic debates of his era—particularly over the 'high art/popular culture' dichotomy—vying with the likes of Adorno, Lukács, Bloch, and developing a close friendship with Benjamin. Brechtian theatre articulated popular themes and forms with avant-garde formal experimentation to create a modernist realism that stood in sharp contrast both to its psychological and socialist varieties. "Brecht's work is the most important and original in European drama since Ibsen and Strindberg," Raymond Williams argues, while Peter Bürger dubs him "the most important materialist writer of our time."[4] Collective and collaborative working methods were inherent to Brecht's approach, as Fredric Jameson (among others) stresses. Jameson describes the creator of the work not as Brecht the individual, but rather as 'Brecht': a collective subject that "certainly seemed to have a distinctive style (the one we now call 'Brechtian') but was no longer personal in the bourgeois or individualistic sense." During the course of his career, Brecht sustained many long-lasting creative relationships with other writers, composers, scenographers, directors, dramaturgs and actors; the list includes: Elisabeth Hauptmann, Margarete Steffin, Ruth Berlau, Slatan Dudow, Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler, Paul Dessau, Caspar Neher, Teo Otto, Karl von Appen, Ernst Busch, Lotte Lenya, Peter Lorre, Therese Giehse, Angelika Hurwicz, Carola Neher, and Helene Weigel herself. This is "theatre as collective experiment [...] as something radically different from theatre as expression or as experience."[5] There are few areas of modern theatrical culture that have not felt the impact or influence of Brecht's ideas and practices; dramatists and directors in whom one may trace a clear Brechtian legacy include: Dario Fo, Augusto Boal, Joan Littlewood, Peter Brook, Peter Weiss, Heiner Müller, Pina Bausch, Tony Kushner, Robert Bolt and Caryl Churchill. In addition to the theatre, Brechtian theories and techniques have exerted considerable sway over certain strands of film theory and cinematic practice; Brecht's influence may be detected in the films of Jean-Luc Godard, Lindsay Anderson, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Joseph Losey, Nagisa Oshima, Ritwik Ghatak, Lars von Trier, Jan Bucquoy and Hal Hartley.[6]


cart/download




Sort by : title duration uploaded event date << >> show footage per page