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Vietnam War stock video footage

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1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam
07:42
SD RM English

Vietnam, Trang Bang

1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam

On June 8th, 1972, South Vietnamese planes dropped a napalm bomb on the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam, suspected by US Army forces of being a Viet Cong stronghold. Kim Phuc Phan Thi (born 1963) was a resident of Trang Bang and after being severely burned in the attack, she fled naked from her village. Her escape was caught on film by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut and the image became one of the most remembered images of the Vietnam War. The photograph earned Ut a Pulitzer Prize. After taking the photograph, Ut promptly took Thi to a hospital in Saigon where it was determined that her burns were so severe that she would not survive. However, after 14 months of medical attention, she returned home. When she was an adult, due to pressure from people to use her as an anti-war symbol she requested permission from the Vietnam government to go to Cuba to resume her studies. By this time she had converted from her family’s religion of Cao Dai to Christianity. Pham Van Dong, the Prime Minister of Vietnam at the time, became a friend and patron of the girl. She then moved to Cuba, after receiving permission, and met Bui Huy Tuan. They married and, in 1992, they went on a honeymoon. During an airplane refueling stop in Gander, Newfoundland, Canada, they got off the plane and defected to Canada. They now live in Toronto and have two children. In 1996, she met with (and expressed forgiveness for) the American officer who ordered the strike; she also met the surgeons who saved her life. On November 10th, 1997, Thi was named a UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador. On October 22nd, 2004, Thi was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Law from York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada for her work to aid child victims of war around the world.


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1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam
08:15
SD RM master

Vietnam, Trang Bang

1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam

On June 8th, 1972, South Vietnamese planes dropped a napalm bomb on the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam, suspected by US Army forces of being a Viet Cong stronghold. Kim Phuc Phan Thi (born 1963) was a resident of Trang Bang and after being severely burned in the attack, she fled naked from her village. Her escape was caught on film by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut and the image became one of the most remembered images of the Vietnam War. The photograph earned Ut a Pulitzer Prize. After taking the photograph, Ut promptly took Thi to a hospital in Saigon where it was determined that her burns were so severe that she would not survive. However, after 14 months of medical attention, she returned home. When she was an adult, due to pressure from people to use her as an anti-war symbol she requested permission from the Vietnam government to go to Cuba to resume her studies. By this time she had converted from her family’s religion of Cao Dai to Christianity. Pham Van Dong, the Prime Minister of Vietnam at the time, became a friend and patron of the girl. She then moved to Cuba, after receiving permission, and met Bui Huy Tuan. They married and, in 1992, they went on a honeymoon. During an airplane refueling stop in Gander, Newfoundland, Canada, they got off the plane and defected to Canada. They now live in Toronto and have two children. In 1996, she met with (and expressed forgiveness for) the American officer who ordered the strike; she also met the surgeons who saved her life. On November 10th, 1997, Thi was named a UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador. On October 22nd, 2004, Thi was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Law from York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada for her work to aid child victims of war around the world.


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1972 - Khim Phuc
08:56
SD RM Russian

Vietnam, Trang Bang

1972 - Khim Phuc

1972 - Khim Phuc:


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1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam
09:06
SD RM German

Vietnam, Trang Bang

1972 - Khim Phuc: a girl from Vietnam

On June 8th, 1972, South Vietnamese planes dropped a napalm bomb on the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam, suspected by US Army forces of being a Viet Cong stronghold. Kim Phuc Phan Thi (born 1963) was a resident of Trang Bang and after being severely burned in the attack, she fled naked from her village. Her escape was caught on film by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut and the image became one of the most remembered images of the Vietnam War. The photograph earned Ut a Pulitzer Prize. After taking the photograph, Ut promptly took Thi to a hospital in Saigon where it was determined that her burns were so severe that she would not survive. However, after 14 months of medical attention, she returned home. When she was an adult, due to pressure from people to use her as an anti-war symbol she requested permission from the Vietnam government to go to Cuba to resume her studies. By this time she had converted from her family’s religion of Cao Dai to Christianity. Pham Van Dong, the Prime Minister of Vietnam at the time, became a friend and patron of the girl. She then moved to Cuba, after receiving permission, and met Bui Huy Tuan. They married and, in 1992, they went on a honeymoon. During an airplane refueling stop in Gander, Newfoundland, Canada, they got off the plane and defected to Canada. They now live in Toronto and have two children. In 1996, she met with (and expressed forgiveness for) the American officer who ordered the strike; she also met the surgeons who saved her life. On November 10th, 1997, Thi was named a UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador. On October 22nd, 2004, Thi was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Law from York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada for her work to aid child victims of war around the world.


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1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest
00:18
SD RM

Germany, Munich

1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest

1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest


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1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy
08:20
SD RM English

Vietnam, Saigon

1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy

By April, the weakened South Vietnamese Army had collapsed on all fronts. The powerful NVA offensive forced South Vietnamese troops on a bloody retreat that ended up as a hopeless siege at Xuan-loc, a city 40 miles from Saigon, and the last South Vietnamese defense line before Saigon. On April 21st, the defense of Xuan-loc collapsed and NVA troops and tanks rapidly advanced to Saigon. On April 27th, 100,000 NVA troops encircled Saigon which was to be defended by 30,000 ARVN troops. On April 29th, the US launched Option IV, the largest helicopter evacuation in history. Chaos, unrest, and panic ensured as hectic Vietnamese scrambled to leave Saigon before it was too late. Helicopters began evacuating from the US embassy and the airport. Evacuations were held to the last minute because US Ambassador Martin thought Saigon could be held and defended. The operation began in an atmosphere of desperation as hysterical mobs of South Vietnamese raced to takeoff spots designated for evacuation, many yelling to be saved. Martin had pleaded to the US government to send $700 million dollars in emergency to South Vietnam in order to bolster the Saigon regimes ability to fight and to mobilize fresh South Vietnamese units. But the plea was rejected. Many Americans felt the Saigon regime would meet certain collapse. President Ford gave a speech on April 23, declaring the end of the Vietnam War and the end of all American aid to the Saigon regime. The helicopter evacuation continued all day and night while NVA tanks reached the outskirts of Saigon. In the early hours of April 30th, the last US Marines left the embassy as hectic Vietnamese breached the embassy perimeter and raided the place. NVA T-54 tanks moved into Saigon. The South Vietnamese resistance was light. Tank skirmishes began as ARVN M-41 tanks attacked the heavily armored Soviet T-34 tanks. NVA troops soon dashed to capture the US embassy, the government army garrison, the police headquarters, radio station, presidential palace, and other vital targets. The NVA encountered greater-than expected resistance as small pockets of ARVN resistance continued. By now, the helicopter evacuations that had saved 7,000 American and Vietnamese had ended. The presidential palace was captured and the Vietcong flag waved victoriously over it. President Minh surrendered Saigon to the NVA colonel Bui Tin. The surrender came over the radio as Minh ordered South Vietnamese forces to lay down their weapons. Columns of South Vietnamese troops came out of defensive positions and surrendered. Saigon fell on April 30th, 1975. As for the Americans, many stayed in South Vietnam but by May 1st, 1975 most Americans had fled, leaving the city of Saigon forever. The Vietnam War was America’s most humiliating defeat, with over 58,000 dead and many left severely injured. As for the people of South Vietnam, over a million ARVN soldiers died in the 30-year conflict.


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1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy
08:12
SD RM master

Vietnam, Saigon

1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy

By April, the weakened South Vietnamese Army had collapsed on all fronts. The powerful NVA offensive forced South Vietnamese troops on a bloody retreat that ended up as a hopeless siege at Xuan-loc, a city 40 miles from Saigon, and the last South Vietnamese defense line before Saigon. On April 21st, the defense of Xuan-loc collapsed and NVA troops and tanks rapidly advanced to Saigon. On April 27th, 100,000 NVA troops encircled Saigon which was to be defended by 30,000 ARVN troops. On April 29th, the US launched Option IV, the largest helicopter evacuation in history. Chaos, unrest, and panic ensured as hectic Vietnamese scrambled to leave Saigon before it was too late. Helicopters began evacuating from the US embassy and the airport. Evacuations were held to the last minute because US Ambassador Martin thought Saigon could be held and defended. The operation began in an atmosphere of desperation as hysterical mobs of South Vietnamese raced to takeoff spots designated for evacuation, many yelling to be saved. Martin had pleaded to the US government to send $700 million dollars in emergency to South Vietnam in order to bolster the Saigon regimes ability to fight and to mobilize fresh South Vietnamese units. But the plea was rejected. Many Americans felt the Saigon regime would meet certain collapse. President Ford gave a speech on April 23, declaring the end of the Vietnam War and the end of all American aid to the Saigon regime. The helicopter evacuation continued all day and night while NVA tanks reached the outskirts of Saigon. In the early hours of April 30th, the last US Marines left the embassy as hectic Vietnamese breached the embassy perimeter and raided the place. NVA T-54 tanks moved into Saigon. The South Vietnamese resistance was light. Tank skirmishes began as ARVN M-41 tanks attacked the heavily armored Soviet T-34 tanks. NVA troops soon dashed to capture the US embassy, the government army garrison, the police headquarters, radio station, presidential palace, and other vital targets. The NVA encountered greater-than expected resistance as small pockets of ARVN resistance continued. By now, the helicopter evacuations that had saved 7,000 American and Vietnamese had ended. The presidential palace was captured and the Vietcong flag waved victoriously over it. President Minh surrendered Saigon to the NVA colonel Bui Tin. The surrender came over the radio as Minh ordered South Vietnamese forces to lay down their weapons. Columns of South Vietnamese troops came out of defensive positions and surrendered. Saigon fell on April 30th, 1975. As for the Americans, many stayed in South Vietnam but by May 1st, 1975 most Americans had fled, leaving the city of Saigon forever. The Vietnam War was America’s most humiliating defeat, with over 58,000 dead and many left severely injured. As for the people of South Vietnam, over a million ARVN soldiers died in the 30-year conflict.


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1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy
08:10
SD RM Russian

Vietnam, Saigon

1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy

By April, the weakened South Vietnamese Army had collapsed on all fronts. The powerful NVA offensive forced South Vietnamese troops on a bloody retreat that ended up as a hopeless siege at Xuan-loc, a city 40 miles from Saigon, and the last South Vietnamese defense line before Saigon. On April 21st, the defense of Xuan-loc collapsed and NVA troops and tanks rapidly advanced to Saigon. On April 27th, 100,000 NVA troops encircled Saigon which was to be defended by 30,000 ARVN troops. On April 29th, the US launched Option IV, the largest helicopter evacuation in history. Chaos, unrest, and panic ensured as hectic Vietnamese scrambled to leave Saigon before it was too late. Helicopters began evacuating from the US embassy and the airport. Evacuations were held to the last minute because US Ambassador Martin thought Saigon could be held and defended. The operation began in an atmosphere of desperation as hysterical mobs of South Vietnamese raced to takeoff spots designated for evacuation, many yelling to be saved. Martin had pleaded to the US government to send $700 million dollars in emergency to South Vietnam in order to bolster the Saigon regimes ability to fight and to mobilize fresh South Vietnamese units. But the plea was rejected. Many Americans felt the Saigon regime would meet certain collapse. President Ford gave a speech on April 23, declaring the end of the Vietnam War and the end of all American aid to the Saigon regime. The helicopter evacuation continued all day and night while NVA tanks reached the outskirts of Saigon. In the early hours of April 30th, the last US Marines left the embassy as hectic Vietnamese breached the embassy perimeter and raided the place. NVA T-54 tanks moved into Saigon. The South Vietnamese resistance was light. Tank skirmishes began as ARVN M-41 tanks attacked the heavily armored Soviet T-34 tanks. NVA troops soon dashed to capture the US embassy, the government army garrison, the police headquarters, radio station, presidential palace, and other vital targets. The NVA encountered greater-than expected resistance as small pockets of ARVN resistance continued. By now, the helicopter evacuations that had saved 7,000 American and Vietnamese had ended. The presidential palace was captured and the Vietcong flag waved victoriously over it. President Minh surrendered Saigon to the NVA colonel Bui Tin. The surrender came over the radio as Minh ordered South Vietnamese forces to lay down their weapons. Columns of South Vietnamese troops came out of defensive positions and surrendered. Saigon fell on April 30th, 1975. As for the Americans, many stayed in South Vietnam but by May 1st, 1975 most Americans had fled, leaving the city of Saigon forever. The Vietnam War was America’s most humiliating defeat, with over 58,000 dead and many left severely injured. As for the people of South Vietnam, over a million ARVN soldiers died in the 30-year conflict.


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1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy
09:09
SD RM German

Vietnam, Saigon

1975 - Vietnam: Flight from the US Embassy

By April, the weakened South Vietnamese Army had collapsed on all fronts. The powerful NVA offensive forced South Vietnamese troops on a bloody retreat that ended up as a hopeless siege at Xuan-loc, a city 40 miles from Saigon, and the last South Vietnamese defense line before Saigon. On April 21st, the defense of Xuan-loc collapsed and NVA troops and tanks rapidly advanced to Saigon. On April 27th, 100,000 NVA troops encircled Saigon which was to be defended by 30,000 ARVN troops. On April 29th, the US launched Option IV, the largest helicopter evacuation in history. Chaos, unrest, and panic ensured as hectic Vietnamese scrambled to leave Saigon before it was too late. Helicopters began evacuating from the US embassy and the airport. Evacuations were held to the last minute because US Ambassador Martin thought Saigon could be held and defended. The operation began in an atmosphere of desperation as hysterical mobs of South Vietnamese raced to takeoff spots designated for evacuation, many yelling to be saved. Martin had pleaded to the US government to send $700 million dollars in emergency to South Vietnam in order to bolster the Saigon regimes ability to fight and to mobilize fresh South Vietnamese units. But the plea was rejected. Many Americans felt the Saigon regime would meet certain collapse. President Ford gave a speech on April 23, declaring the end of the Vietnam War and the end of all American aid to the Saigon regime. The helicopter evacuation continued all day and night while NVA tanks reached the outskirts of Saigon. In the early hours of April 30th, the last US Marines left the embassy as hectic Vietnamese breached the embassy perimeter and raided the place. NVA T-54 tanks moved into Saigon. The South Vietnamese resistance was light. Tank skirmishes began as ARVN M-41 tanks attacked the heavily armored Soviet T-34 tanks. NVA troops soon dashed to capture the US embassy, the government army garrison, the police headquarters, radio station, presidential palace, and other vital targets. The NVA encountered greater-than expected resistance as small pockets of ARVN resistance continued. By now, the helicopter evacuations that had saved 7,000 American and Vietnamese had ended. The presidential palace was captured and the Vietcong flag waved victoriously over it. President Minh surrendered Saigon to the NVA colonel Bui Tin. The surrender came over the radio as Minh ordered South Vietnamese forces to lay down their weapons. Columns of South Vietnamese troops came out of defensive positions and surrendered. Saigon fell on April 30th, 1975. As for the Americans, many stayed in South Vietnam but by May 1st, 1975 most Americans had fled, leaving the city of Saigon forever. The Vietnam War was America’s most humiliating defeat, with over 58,000 dead and many left severely injured. As for the people of South Vietnam, over a million ARVN soldiers died in the 30-year conflict.


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A day on duty: Vietnam's documentary 3
04:09
SD RM Vietnamese

Vietnam

A day on duty: Vietnam's documentary 3

Through a day on duty of female militia unit, the film highlights the revolutionary heroism of people on firing line, against invader force.


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A day on duty: Vietnams documentary 2
04:15
SD RM Vietnamese

Vietnam

A day on duty: Vietnams documentary 2

Through a day on duty of female militia unit, the film highlights the revolutionary heroism of people on firing line, against invader force.


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A day on duty: Vietnam's documentary 1
05:02
SD RM Vietnamese

Vietnam

A day on duty: Vietnam's documentary 1

Through a day on duty of female militia unit, the film highlights the revolutionary heroism of people on firing line, against invader force.  -Golden Lotus prize at the 1st Vietnam Film Festival in 1970 -Prize of World Peace Council at the Leipzig International Film Festival (Germany – 1969)


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Agent Orange: story of Hoa
07:01
SD RM master

Vietnam, Hanoi

Agent Orange: story of Hoa

The 1-meter-high Bui Thi Hoa is 27 years old. She is living in the Friendship Children's village not far from Hanoi... The village was established by an American veteran for the victims of the Agent Orange: story of Hoa Agent Orange was the herbicide, what between 1965 and '71 the U.S. Army's sprayed 72 million liters onto Vietnam forests, to obliterate the dense jungles. But it caused not only their downfall ...


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Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protest against the Vietnam War and Lyndon B. Johnson's politics, procession, demonstration, police action
00:24
SD RM

United States, Chicago

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protest against the Vietnam War and Lyndon B. Johnson's politics, procession, demonstration, police action

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protest against the Vietnam War and Lyndon B. Johnson's politics, procession, demonstration, police action


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Anti-Vietnam War protest: Student protest against Vietnam War, marching in black with names of Vietnamese cities on them
00:17
SD RM master

United States

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Student protest against Vietnam War, marching in black with names of Vietnamese cities on them

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Student protest against Vietnam War, marching in black with names of Vietnamese cities on them


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Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protesters are playing a scene of Vietnam War, running up the stairs at the Capitol with fake guns, singing together, police action, arrest, marching across the bridge
00:43
SD RM

United States, Washington

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protesters are playing a scene of Vietnam War, running up the stairs at the Capitol with fake guns, singing together, police action, arrest, marching across the bridge

Anti-Vietnam War protest: Protesters are playing a scene of Vietnam War, running up the stairs at the Capitol with fake guns, singing together, police action, arrest, marching across the bridge


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Battle of Ban Me Thuot: South vietnamese counterattack on the north vietnamese troops, grenade launcher, collecting injured soldiers
01:30
SD RM

Vietnam, South Vietnam, Buon Ma Thuot

Battle of Ban Me Thuot: South vietnamese counterattack on the north vietnamese troops, grenade launcher, collecting injured soldiers

Battle of Ban Me Thuot: South vietnamese counterattack on the north vietnamese troops, grenade launcher, collecting injured soldiers


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Battle of Dien Bien Phu: French paratroopers being air dropped into Dien Bien Phu, Vietnam War
00:19
SD RM

Vietnam, Dien Bien Phu, North Vietnam

Battle of Dien Bien Phu: French paratroopers being air dropped into Dien Bien Phu, Vietnam War

Battle of Dien Bien Phu: French paratroopers being air dropped into Dien Bien Phu, Vietnam War


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Bombing: Vietnamese boy looking up the sky, hiding in bamboo, covering his head, feature
01:26
SD RM

Vietnam

Bombing: Vietnamese boy looking up the sky, hiding in bamboo, covering his head, feature

Bombing: Vietnamese boy looking up the sky, hiding in bamboo, covering his head, feature


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Buddhist crisis: Buddhist protest, protesting against the persecution of Buddhists, police action
00:32
SD RM

Vietnam, South Vietnam

Buddhist crisis: Buddhist protest, protesting against the persecution of Buddhists, police action

Buddhist crisis: Buddhist protest, protesting against the persecution of Buddhists, police action


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