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Yugoslavian war stock video footage

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1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war
08:18
SD RM English

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Omarska

1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war

Omarska is a town near Prijedor in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina. It includes an old iron mine and ore processing plant. Omarska gained worldwide infamy as the location for a detention or concentration camp set up by the authorities of the Republika Srpska during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia. It was officially termed investigation centre and the detainees were Bosnian Muslim and Croatian men that the Serbs accused of paramilitary activities. Persons indicted at the ICTY regarding the mistreatment of prisoners at Omarska have included Momčilo Gruban, Duško Knežević and Željko Meakić.


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1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war
08:09
SD RM master

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Omarska

1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war

Omarska is a town near Prijedor in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina. It includes an old iron mine and ore processing plant. Omarska gained worldwide infamy as the location for a detention or concentration camp set up by the authorities of the Republika Srpska during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia. It was officially termed investigation centre and the detainees were Bosnian Muslim and Croatian men that the Serbs accused of paramilitary activities. Persons indicted at the ICTY regarding the mistreatment of prisoners at Omarska have included Momčilo Gruban, Duško Knežević and Željko Meakić.


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1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war
09:07
SD RM German

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Omarska

1992 - Omarska: The Bosnian war

Omarska is a town near Prijedor in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina. It includes an old iron mine and ore processing plant. Omarska gained worldwide infamy as the location for a detention or concentration camp set up by the authorities of the Republika Srpska during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia. It was officially termed investigation centre and the detainees were Bosnian Muslim and Croatian men that the Serbs accused of paramilitary activities. Persons indicted at the ICTY regarding the mistreatment of prisoners at Omarska have included Momčilo Gruban, Duško Knežević and Željko Meakić.


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Drug: soldiers after the war in Croatia
07:24
SD RM master

Croatia, Split

Drug: soldiers after the war in Croatia

Drug: soldiers after the war in Croatia


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Flag: Croatian flag on fire
00:20
SD RM

Croatia

Flag: Croatian flag on fire

Flag: Croatian flag on fire soldiers set the croatian flag on fire


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Health: bulletproof glasses
04:23
SD RM English

Croatia, Rijeka

Health: bulletproof glasses

bulletproof glasses


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Health: bulletproof glasses
04:23
SD RM master

Croatia, Rijeka

Health: bulletproof glasses

bulletproof glasses


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Sardinia: Nurage di Sant Antine - ruined building
00:38
SD RM master

Italy, Sardinia

Sardinia: Nurage di Sant Antine - ruined building

Sardinia: Nurage di Sant Antine - ruined building


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Wagon  village: war refugees living in wagons
06:44
SD RM English

Croatia

Wagon village: war refugees living in wagons

Wagon village: war refugees living in wagons


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Wagon  village: war refugees living in wagons
06:44
SD RM master

Croatia

Wagon village: war refugees living in wagons

Wagon village: war refugees living in wagons  


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Yugoslav Wars: Leaving SFOR tanks
00:22
SD RM master

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Yugoslav Wars: Leaving SFOR tanks

Yugoslaw wars: Leaving SFOR tanks The Stabilization Force (SFOR) was a NATO-led multinational peacekeeping force deployed to Bosnia and Herzegovina after the Bosnian war. Although SFOR was led by NATO, several non-NATO countries contributed troops.


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Yugoslav wars: Bosnian parliament under attack
00:22
SD RM master

Yugoslavia, Sarajevo

Yugoslav wars: Bosnian parliament under attack

Yugoslav wars: Bosnian parliament under attack The building of the parliament and other part of the city of Sarajevo in under gunfire in 1992.


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Yugoslav wars: Bombing houses and vehicles, fire, smoke, military tank, pushing car with tank
00:09
SD RM master

Yugoslavia

Yugoslav wars: Bombing houses and vehicles, fire, smoke, military tank, pushing car with tank

Yugoslav wars: Bombing houses and vehicles, fire, smoke, military tank, pushing car with tank


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - people fleeing from the Yugoslav army
00:43
SD RM

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - people fleeing from the Yugoslav army

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - people fleeing from the Yugoslav army. Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - Serb volunteer soldiers with chetniks flag
00:16
SD RM

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - Serb volunteer soldiers with chetniks flag

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - Serb volunteer soldiers with chetniks flag Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - wounded and dead at the hospital
01:00
SD RM

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - wounded and dead at the hospital

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - wounded and dead at the hospital Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - shot houses, ruins
01:30
SD RM

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - shot houses, ruins

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - shot houses, ruins Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - hospital, wounded, doctors
00:51
SD RM master

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - hospital, wounded, doctors

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - people fleeing from the Yugoslav army. Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - military trucks and soldiers
00:28
SD RM master

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - military trucks and soldiers

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - military trucks and soldiers Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - corpses in the hospital courtyard
00:18
SD RM master

Yogoslavia, Vukovar

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - corpses in the hospital courtyard

Yugoslavian war: Vukovar - wounded and dead at the hospital Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river and the Danube. Vukovar is the center of the Vukovar-Srijem county. The city's registered population was 30,126 in the 2001 census, with 31,670 in the municipality. Vukovar was completely devastated during the Croatian War of Independence. The town had for months warded off the JNA-supported Serb military attacks on the city. 2,000 self-organised defenders (the army of Croatia was still in an embryonic stage at that time) defended the city for approximately 87 days against approx. 36 000 JNA (Serbian) troops aided with 110 vehicles and tanks, and dozens of planes when it was eventually overrun, with the city destroyed almost beyond recognition. It is estimated that 2,000 defenders of Vukovar and civilians were killed, 800 went missing and 22,000 civilians were killed or forced into exile. Vukovar is notorious for the devastation it suffered, the worst in Europe since World War II, drawing comparisons with the World War II–era Stalingrad, although Vukovar was on a much smaller scale. The watertower riddled with bullet holes, was retained by city planners to serve as a testimony to the events of the early 1990s. On 18 November 2006 approximately 25,000 people from all over the country gathered in Vukovar for the 15th anniversary of the fall of the city, where they commemorated those who were killed. A museum dedicated to the siege was opened in the basement of the hospital that was attacked, which has now been rebuilt. On 27 September 2007, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia convicted two former Yugoslav Army officers and acquitted a third of involvement in the hospital massacre.


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