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Hitler Adolf stock video footage

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11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens
01:01
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens


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11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika,
00:23
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika,

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
08:23
SD RM English

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
08:16
SD RM master

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
09:05
SD RM German

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
08:23
SD RM English

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
08:16
SD RM master

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
09:12
SD RM German

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:11
SD RM English

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:06
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


cart/download

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
09:15
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:59
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1936 -  Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games
08:26
SD RM English

Germany, Berlin

1936 - Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games

James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens was an American track and field athlete who specialized in the sprints and the long jump. He participated in the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, where he achieved international fame by winning four gold medals: one each in the 100 meters, the 200 meters, the long jump, and as part of the 4x100 meter relay team. He was the most successful athlete at the 1936 Summer Olympics, a victory more poignant and often noted because Adolf Hitler had intended the 1936 games to showcase his Aryan ideals and prowess.


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1936 -  Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games
08:14
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

1936 - Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games

James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens was an American track and field athlete who specialized in the sprints and the long jump. He participated in the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, where he achieved international fame by winning four gold medals: one each in the 100 meters, the 200 meters, the long jump, and as part of the 4x100 meter relay team. He was the most successful athlete at the 1936 Summer Olympics, a victory more poignant and often noted because Adolf Hitler had intended the 1936 games to showcase his Aryan ideals and prowess.


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1936 -  Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games
09:10
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1936 - Jesse Owens: Hero of the Olympic Games

James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens was an American track and field athlete who specialized in the sprints and the long jump. He participated in the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, where he achieved international fame by winning four gold medals: one each in the 100 meters, the 200 meters, the long jump, and as part of the 4x100 meter relay team. He was the most successful athlete at the 1936 Summer Olympics, a victory more poignant and often noted because Adolf Hitler had intended the 1936 games to showcase his Aryan ideals and prowess.


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1936 Summer Olympics: Opening ceremony
01:11
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

1936 Summer Olympics: Opening ceremony

1936 Summer Olympics: Opening ceremony Hitler greets the national olympic teams. Greece, Italy, France


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1936 Summer Olympics: Adolf Hitler officially opens the olympic games
00:16
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1936 Summer Olympics: Adolf Hitler officially opens the olympic games

1936 Summer Olympics: Adolf Hitler officially opens the olympic games


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1936 Summer Olympics: Propaganda show during opening ceremony
00:35
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

1936 Summer Olympics: Propaganda show during opening ceremony

1936 Summer Olympics: Propaganda show during opening ceremony


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1938 - Munich Conference: annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland
08:15
SD RM English

Germany, Munich

1938 - Munich Conference: annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland

The Munich Agreement was an agreement regarding the Munich Crisis between the major powers of Europe after a conference held in Munich in Germany in 1938 and concluded on September 29. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the future of Czechoslovakia and it ended up surrendering much of that state to Nazi Germany. It stands as a major example of appeasement. Because Czechoslovakia was not invited to the conference, the Munich Agreement is commonly called the Munich Dictate by the Czechs. The phrase Munich betrayal is also frequently used, especially because of the military alliances between Czechoslovakia and France and between France and Britain, that were not taken into account.


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1938 - Munich Conference: annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland
08:11
SD RM master

Germany, Munich

1938 - Munich Conference: annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland

The Munich Agreement was an agreement regarding the Munich Crisis between the major powers of Europe after a conference held in Munich in Germany in 1938 and concluded on September 29. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the future of Czechoslovakia and it ended up surrendering much of that state to Nazi Germany. It stands as a major example of appeasement. Because Czechoslovakia was not invited to the conference, the Munich Agreement is commonly called the Munich Dictate by the Czechs. The phrase Munich betrayal is also frequently used, especially because of the military alliances between Czechoslovakia and France and between France and Britain, that were not taken into account.


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