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demonstration, riot stock video footage

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1909 - Suffragette Demonstrations: Women battle for equal rights
08:18
SD RM English

United Kingdom, London

1909 - Suffragette Demonstrations: Women battle for equal rights

The campaign for women"s suffrage was intensified by the founding of the Women"s Social and Political Union. The WSPU - associated particularly with Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters, Christabel and Sylvia - was far more militant than the National Union of Women"s Suffrage Societies, led by Milicent Garrett Fawcett. WSPU members, known as "suffragettes", became increasingly violent in the years before World War One, as successive governments failed to reform the voting laws. The harsh manner in which imprisoned suffragettes were treated, including forcible feeding of women on hunger strike, contributed to the growing public sympathy for the cause of women"s suffrage (in tandem with imaginative - and legal - campaigning of the moderate NUWSS).


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1909 - Suffragette Demonstrations: Women battle for equal rights
08:12
SD RM master

United Kingdom, London

1909 - Suffragette Demonstrations: Women battle for equal rights

The campaign for women"s suffrage was intensified by the founding of the Women"s Social and Political Union. The WSPU - associated particularly with Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters, Christabel and Sylvia - was far more militant than the National Union of Women"s Suffrage Societies, led by Milicent Garrett Fawcett. WSPU members, known as "suffragettes", became increasingly violent in the years before World War One, as successive governments failed to reform the voting laws. The harsh manner in which imprisoned suffragettes were treated, including forcible feeding of women on hunger strike, contributed to the growing public sympathy for the cause of women"s suffrage (in tandem with imaginative - and legal - campaigning of the moderate NUWSS).


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1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March
08:23
SD RM English

India, Arabian Sea

1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March

On March 12th, 1930 Mahatma Gandhi sets off with 78 followers on a 200-mile protest march towards the sea to protest the British monopoly on salt. More will join them during the Salt March that ends on April 5th. He gained worldwide publicity through his policies of civil disobedience, non-cooperation, and the use of fasting as a form of protest. The British authorities repeatedly imprisoned him. His longest term of imprisonment began on March 18th, 1922 when he was sentenced to six years for civil disobedience; he only served 2 years of that sentence, however. Gandhi spent a total of 2,338 days in prison during his lifetime. His philosophy of non-violence, for which he coined the term satyagraha, has influenced both national and international movements for peaceful change.


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1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March
08:17
SD RM master

India, Arabian Sea

1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March

On March 12th, 1930 Mahatma Gandhi sets off with 78 followers on a 200-mile protest march towards the sea to protest the British monopoly on salt. More will join them during the Salt March that ends on April 5th. He gained worldwide publicity through his policies of civil disobedience, non-cooperation, and the use of fasting as a form of protest. The British authorities repeatedly imprisoned him. His longest term of imprisonment began on March 18th, 1922 when he was sentenced to six years for civil disobedience; he only served 2 years of that sentence, however. Gandhi spent a total of 2,338 days in prison during his lifetime. His philosophy of non-violence, for which he coined the term satyagraha, has influenced both national and international movements for peaceful change.


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1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March
09:12
SD RM German

India, Arabian Sea

1930 - Gandhi: The Salt March

On March 12th, 1930 Mahatma Gandhi sets off with 78 followers on a 200-mile protest march towards the sea to protest the British monopoly on salt. More will join them during the Salt March that ends on April 5th. He gained worldwide publicity through his policies of civil disobedience, non-cooperation, and the use of fasting as a form of protest. The British authorities repeatedly imprisoned him. His longest term of imprisonment began on March 18th, 1922 when he was sentenced to six years for civil disobedience; he only served 2 years of that sentence, however. Gandhi spent a total of 2,338 days in prison during his lifetime. His philosophy of non-violence, for which he coined the term satyagraha, has influenced both national and international movements for peaceful change.


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1953 Iranian coup d'état: Violent protest on street
00:12
SD RM

Iran, Tehran

1953 Iranian coup d'état: Violent protest on street

1953 Iranian coup d'état: Violent protest on street


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1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary
08:25
SD RM English

Hungary, Budapest

1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a revolt in Hungary. The revolt was brutally suppressed by the Soviet Union. Thousands of Hungarian insurgents and Soviet troops were killed, thousands more were wounded, and nearly a quarter million left the country as refugees. The revolution was a watershed event for Communists in Western countries; some who had formerly supported the Soviet Union now criticized it. On October 23rd, 1956, Hungary"s population rose up against their government. The population achieved control over a large number of social institutions and territory, and the Hungarians began to implement their own policies. One policy on which Hungarians were divided was the status of known ÁVH (secret police) informants; the workers councils and student councils sent armed bands out to arrest ÁVH operatives in preparation for criminal trials; whereas the small ultra-nationalist right-wing groups led by the likes of Jozsef Dudas infamously executed members of the ÁVH. The Hungarian Communist Party made Imre Nagy Prime Minister. After negotiating a ceasefire with Soviet forces in Hungary, Nagy was forced by public opinion to withdraw Hungary from the Warsaw Pact and declare neutrality. Soviet troops were invited into Hungary on two occasions, both in attempts to firm up Moscow line governments (the Gero government that collapsed on the October 23rd and the Kadar government formed on November 3rd). Soviet troops and the Hungarian ÁVH intervened on the night of October 23rd and subsequent days, attacking protestors; this resulted in a ceasefire between Soviet troops and insurgents by November 1st, 1956. On the night of November 4th, 1956, the Soviet army again intervened to halt this process of popular reform. By January, 1957, Kadar had brought the instability to an end. Because of the rapid change in government and social policies, the role of left-wing ideology in motivating some of the population, and the use of armed force to achieve political goals, this uprising is often considered a revolution.


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1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary
08:17
SD RM master

Hungary, Budapest

1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a revolt in Hungary. The revolt was brutally suppressed by the Soviet Union. Thousands of Hungarian insurgents and Soviet troops were killed, thousands more were wounded, and nearly a quarter million left the country as refugees. The revolution was a watershed event for Communists in Western countries; some who had formerly supported the Soviet Union now criticized it. On October 23rd, 1956, Hungary"s population rose up against their government. The population achieved control over a large number of social institutions and territory, and the Hungarians began to implement their own policies. One policy on which Hungarians were divided was the status of known ÁVH (secret police) informants; the workers councils and student councils sent armed bands out to arrest ÁVH operatives in preparation for criminal trials; whereas the small ultra-nationalist right-wing groups led by the likes of Jozsef Dudas infamously executed members of the ÁVH. The Hungarian Communist Party made Imre Nagy Prime Minister. After negotiating a ceasefire with Soviet forces in Hungary, Nagy was forced by public opinion to withdraw Hungary from the Warsaw Pact and declare neutrality. Soviet troops were invited into Hungary on two occasions, both in attempts to firm up Moscow line governments (the Gero government that collapsed on the October 23rd and the Kadar government formed on November 3rd). Soviet troops and the Hungarian ÁVH intervened on the night of October 23rd and subsequent days, attacking protestors; this resulted in a ceasefire between Soviet troops and insurgents by November 1st, 1956. On the night of November 4th, 1956, the Soviet army again intervened to halt this process of popular reform. By January, 1957, Kadar had brought the instability to an end. Because of the rapid change in government and social policies, the role of left-wing ideology in motivating some of the population, and the use of armed force to achieve political goals, this uprising is often considered a revolution.


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1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary
09:15
SD RM German

Hungary, Budapest

1956 - Hungarian Revolution: Anti-Communist Protest in Hungary

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a revolt in Hungary. The revolt was brutally suppressed by the Soviet Union. Thousands of Hungarian insurgents and Soviet troops were killed, thousands more were wounded, and nearly a quarter million left the country as refugees. The revolution was a watershed event for Communists in Western countries; some who had formerly supported the Soviet Union now criticized it. On October 23rd, 1956, Hungary"s population rose up against their government. The population achieved control over a large number of social institutions and territory, and the Hungarians began to implement their own policies. One policy on which Hungarians were divided was the status of known ÁVH (secret police) informants; the workers councils and student councils sent armed bands out to arrest ÁVH operatives in preparation for criminal trials; whereas the small ultra-nationalist right-wing groups led by the likes of Jozsef Dudas infamously executed members of the ÁVH. The Hungarian Communist Party made Imre Nagy Prime Minister. After negotiating a ceasefire with Soviet forces in Hungary, Nagy was forced by public opinion to withdraw Hungary from the Warsaw Pact and declare neutrality. Soviet troops were invited into Hungary on two occasions, both in attempts to firm up Moscow line governments (the Gero government that collapsed on the October 23rd and the Kadar government formed on November 3rd). Soviet troops and the Hungarian ÁVH intervened on the night of October 23rd and subsequent days, attacking protestors; this resulted in a ceasefire between Soviet troops and insurgents by November 1st, 1956. On the night of November 4th, 1956, the Soviet army again intervened to halt this process of popular reform. By January, 1957, Kadar had brought the instability to an end. Because of the rapid change in government and social policies, the role of left-wing ideology in motivating some of the population, and the use of armed force to achieve political goals, this uprising is often considered a revolution.


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1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration
08:22
SD RM English

Germany, Berlin

1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration

Benno Ohnesorg  was a German university student killed by a police officer on June 2nd, 1967, during a demonstration in Berlin against the visit of the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, to Germany. It was the first political demonstration that the married student of Romance and German literature and culture studies attended as part of the German student movement. His death served as a rallying point for the radical left wing, and the June 2nd Movement group was named after the day of his death. The left-wing students" movement of the late 1960s that swelled after Benno Ohnesorg"s death influenced a large number of German politicians who were in their teens and twenties at the time. It has been viewed by many as the second-most influential and important event in Germany during the period of East and West Germany, second only to the construction of the Berlin Wall. A monument in Berlin memorializes Benno Ohnesorg"s death, and in his hometown of Hanover, a bridge over the Ihme river is named after him.


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1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration
08:14
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration

Benno Ohnesorg  was a German university student killed by a police officer on June 2nd, 1967, during a demonstration in Berlin against the visit of the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, to Germany. It was the first political demonstration that the married student of Romance and German literature and culture studies attended as part of the German student movement. His death served as a rallying point for the radical left wing, and the June 2nd Movement group was named after the day of his death. The left-wing students" movement of the late 1960s that swelled after Benno Ohnesorg"s death influenced a large number of German politicians who were in their teens and twenties at the time. It has been viewed by many as the second-most influential and important event in Germany during the period of East and West Germany, second only to the construction of the Berlin Wall. A monument in Berlin memorializes Benno Ohnesorg"s death, and in his hometown of Hanover, a bridge over the Ihme river is named after him.


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1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration
09:10
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1967 - The Death of the Demonstrator: Benno Ohnesorg a German university student killed by a policeman during a demonstration

Benno Ohnesorg  was a German university student killed by a police officer on June 2nd, 1967, during a demonstration in Berlin against the visit of the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, to Germany. It was the first political demonstration that the married student of Romance and German literature and culture studies attended as part of the German student movement. His death served as a rallying point for the radical left wing, and the June 2nd Movement group was named after the day of his death. The left-wing students" movement of the late 1960s that swelled after Benno Ohnesorg"s death influenced a large number of German politicians who were in their teens and twenties at the time. It has been viewed by many as the second-most influential and important event in Germany during the period of East and West Germany, second only to the construction of the Berlin Wall. A monument in Berlin memorializes Benno Ohnesorg"s death, and in his hometown of Hanover, a bridge over the Ihme river is named after him.


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1968 - The end of Prague spring: words against tanks - Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries invaded the CSSR.
08:26
SD RM master

Czechoslovakia, Prague

1968 - The end of Prague spring: words against tanks - Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries invaded the CSSR.

On the night of 20–21 August 1968, Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries (Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Poland and Hungary) invaded the ČSSR.   The Prague Spring was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia starting January 5th, 1968, and running until August 20th of that same year when the USSR and its Warsaw Pact allies (except for Romania ) invaded the country. The Czechs and Slovaks showed increasing signs of independence under the leadership of Alexander Dubček. Dubček"s reforms of the political process inside Czechoslovakia, which he referred to as "Socialism with a human face," did not represent a complete overthrow of the old regime, as was the case in Hungary in 1956. However, it was still seen by the Soviet leadership as a threat to their hegemony over other Eastern Bloc states and to the very safety of the Soviet Union. Czechoslovakia was in the middle of the defensive line of the Warsaw Pact and its possible defection to the enemy was unacceptable during the cold war. Furthermore, the role of Czechoslovakia in allowing Hitler to conquer Europe by refusing Soviet military help 30 years earlier and surrendering to Nazi Germany without resistance was still fresh in everyone"s memory.


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1968 - The end of Prague spring: words against tanks - Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries invaded the CSSR.
08:26
SD RM Russian

Czechoslovakia, Prague

1968 - The end of Prague spring: words against tanks - Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries invaded the CSSR.

On the night of 20–21 August 1968, Eastern Bloc armies from four Warsaw Pact countries (Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Poland and Hungary) invaded the ČSSR.   The Prague Spring was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia starting January 5th, 1968, and running until August 20th of that same year when the USSR and its Warsaw Pact allies (except for Romania ) invaded the country. The Czechs and Slovaks showed increasing signs of independence under the leadership of Alexander Dubček. Dubček"s reforms of the political process inside Czechoslovakia, which he referred to as "Socialism with a human face," did not represent a complete overthrow of the old regime, as was the case in Hungary in 1956. However, it was still seen by the Soviet leadership as a threat to their hegemony over other Eastern Bloc states and to the very safety of the Soviet Union. Czechoslovakia was in the middle of the defensive line of the Warsaw Pact and its possible defection to the enemy was unacceptable during the cold war. Furthermore, the role of Czechoslovakia in allowing Hitler to conquer Europe by refusing Soviet military help 30 years earlier and surrendering to Nazi Germany without resistance was still fresh in everyone"s memory.


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1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest
00:18
SD RM

Germany, Munich

1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest

1972 Summer Olympics: German protest against the Vietnam War, procession, protesters with banners, police intervention, arrest


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1976 - The Mourning in Soweto: the bloody end of student protests
08:13
SD RM master

South Africa, Soweto

1976 - The Mourning in Soweto: the bloody end of student protests

Soweto is an urban area in Johannesburg, in Gauteng province South Africa . In 1950 during the apartheid regime, Soweto was constructed to be self-sufficent for the specific purpose of housing African people who were then living in areas designated by the government for white settlement (such as the multi-racial area called Sophiatown). It began as a grouping of the farms Doornkop, Klipriviersoog, Diepkloof, Klipspruit and Vogelstruisfontein. Todays Soweto, incorporating Orlando, Dobsonville, Diepkloof and Dube, remains an overwhelmingly black-dominated city with over three million people. The name Soweto is a contraction of "South Western Townships" and does not mean anything besides this in any South African language. Soweto came to the worlds attention in 1976, when riots broke out over the governments decision to enforce education in Afrikaans rather than English. A series of bombs rocked Soweto in October 2002. The explosions, believed to be the work of the Boeremag, a right wing extremist group, damaged buildings and railway lines, and killed one person.


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1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa
08:23
SD RM English

Poland, Danzig

1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa

Gdansk was the scene of anti-government demonstrations which led to the downfall of Poland"s communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka in December, 1970, and ten years later the Gdansk Shipyard was the birthplace of the Solidarity trade union movement, whose opposition to the government led to the end of communist party rule (1989) and to the eleciton as Polish president of its leader Lech Walesa.


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1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa
08:21
SD RM master

Poland, Danzig

1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa

Gdansk was the scene of anti-government demonstrations which led to the downfall of Poland"s communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka in December, 1970, and ten years later the Gdansk Shipyard was the birthplace of the Solidarity trade union movement, whose opposition to the government led to the end of communist party rule (1989) and to the eleciton as Polish president of its leader Lech Walesa.


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1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa
08:17
SD RM master

Poland, Danzig

1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa

Gdansk was the scene of anti-government demonstrations which led to the downfall of Poland"s communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka in December, 1970, and ten years later the Gdansk Shipyard was the birthplace of the Solidarity trade union movement, whose opposition to the government led to the end of communist party rule (1989) and to the eleciton as Polish president of its leader Lech Walesa.


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1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa
09:14
SD RM German

Poland, Danzig

1980 - The strike: Solidarnosc and Lech Walesa

Gdansk was the scene of anti-government demonstrations which led to the downfall of Poland"s communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka in December, 1970, and ten years later the Gdansk Shipyard was the birthplace of the Solidarity trade union movement, whose opposition to the government led to the end of communist party rule (1989) and to the eleciton as Polish president of its leader Lech Walesa.


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