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11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens
01:01
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, Göring - teams, Jesse Owens


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11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika,
00:23
SD RM

Germany, Berlin

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika,

11th Olympics, Berlin, 1936: opening ceremony, Hitler, swastika


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1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution
08:25
SD RM English

Russia, St.Petersburg

1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a political movement in Russia that climaxed in 1917 with the overthrow of the provisional government that had replaced the Russian Czar system, and led to the establishment of the Soviet Union, which lasted until its collapse in 1991. The Revolution can be viewed in two distinct phases. The first was that of the February Revolution of 1917, which displaced the autocracy of Czar Nicholas II of Russia, the last Czar of Russia, and sought to establish in its place a liberal republic. The second phase was the October Revolution, in which the Soviets were inspired and increasingly controlled by Vladimir Lenin.


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1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution
08:38
SD RM Russian

Russia, St.Petersburg

1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a political movement in Russia that climaxed in 1917 with the overthrow of the provisional government that had replaced the Russian Czar system, and led to the establishment of the Soviet Union, which lasted until its collapse in 1991. The Revolution can be viewed in two distinct phases. The first was that of the February Revolution of 1917, which displaced the autocracy of Czar Nicholas II of Russia, the last Czar of Russia, and sought to establish in its place a liberal republic. The second phase was the October Revolution, in which the Soviets were inspired and increasingly controlled by Vladimir Lenin.


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1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution
08:17
SD RM master

Russia, St.Petersburg

1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a political movement in Russia that climaxed in 1917 with the overthrow of the provisional government that had replaced the Russian Tsar system, and led to the establishment of the Soviet Union, which lasted until its collapse in 1991. The Revolution can be viewed in two distinct phases. The first was that of the February Revolution of 1917, which displaced the autocracy of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, the last Tsar of Russia, and sought to establish in its place a liberal republic. The second phase was the October Revolution, in which the Soviets were inspired and increasingly controlled by Vladimir Lenin.


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1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution
09:13
SD RM German

Russia, St.Petersburg

1917 - The Storming of the Winter Palace: The Russian October Revolution

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a political movement in Russia that climaxed in 1917 with the overthrow of the provisional government that had replaced the Russian Czar system, and led to the establishment of the Soviet Union, which lasted until its collapse in 1991. The Revolution can be viewed in two distinct phases. The first was that of the February Revolution of 1917, which displaced the autocracy of Czar Nicholas II of Russia, the last Czar of Russia, and sought to establish in its place a liberal republic. The second phase was the October Revolution, in which the Soviets were inspired and increasingly controlled by Vladimir Lenin.


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
08:23
SD RM English

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
08:16
SD RM master

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch
09:05
SD RM German

Germany, Munich

1923 - The coup day of Hitler: The Beer Hall Putsch

The attempted Beer Hall Putsch (military coup) occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8, 1923 and early afternoon Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi party"s Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich, Bavaria, Germany.


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1924 -  Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power
08:18
SD RM English

Soviet Union, Moscow

1924 - Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power

January 21, 1924 - Vladimir Lenin dies and Joseph Stalin begins to purge his rivals to clear way for his leadership. Stalin had become the General Secretary of the Soviet Communist Party in 1922; following the death of Vladimir Lenin, he prevailed over Leon Trotsky in a power struggle during the 1920s and fully consolidated his authority with the Great Purge, a period of severe repression which reached its peak in 1937. He remained in power through World War II and until his death in 1953. Stalin molded the features that characterized the new Soviet regime; his policies, based on Marxist-Leninist ideology, are often considered to represent a political and economic system called Stalinism.


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1924 -  Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power
08:12
SD RM master

Soviet Union, Moscow

1924 - Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power

January 21, 1924 - Vladimir Lenin dies and Joseph Stalin begins to purge his rivals to clear way for his leadership. Stalin had become the General Secretary of the Soviet Communist Party in 1922; following the death of Vladimir Lenin, he prevailed over Leon Trotsky in a power struggle during the 1920s and fully consolidated his authority with the Great Purge, a period of severe repression which reached its peak in 1937. He remained in power through World War II and until his death in 1953. Stalin molded the features that characterized the new Soviet regime; his policies, based on Marxist-Leninist ideology, are often considered to represent a political and economic system called Stalinism.


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1924 -  Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power
09:10
SD RM German

Soviet Union, Moscow

1924 - Death of Lenin: Stalin's grip on power

January 21, 1924 - Vladimir Lenin dies and Joseph Stalin begins to purge his rivals to clear way for his leadership. Stalin had become the General Secretary of the Soviet Communist Party in 1922; following the death of Vladimir Lenin, he prevailed over Leon Trotsky in a power struggle during the 1920s and fully consolidated his authority with the Great Purge, a period of severe repression which reached its peak in 1937. He remained in power through World War II and until his death in 1953. Stalin molded the features that characterized the new Soviet regime; his policies, based on Marxist-Leninist ideology, are often considered to represent a political and economic system called Stalinism.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
08:23
SD RM English

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
08:16
SD RM master

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


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1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic
09:12
SD RM German

Germany, Weimar

1932 - The Crisis: The End of the Weimar Republic

Perhaps the greatest catalyst for the collapse of the Republic lies in the Wall Street Crash, or more correctly its aftermath. The grounds for the German recovery were overly dependent on loans from America under the Dawes and then Young plans. However, with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, America was forced to recall her debts, this directly led to the deterioration of Germany"s economy and in turn party relations in the Riechstag, a catastrophic event when a country is ruled by coalitions. Following this, Heinrich Bruning was appointed as Chancellor in March 1930; it was the deterioration of the coalition system that led to Hindenburg allowing Bruning to rule by presidential decree, known as Article 48, should he require it. This meant that the Riechstag had to merely tolerate his decrees and not support them. Yet in 1930, the Riechstag refused Bruning"s emergency measures to compensate for the failing economy, which included cutting government spending on things such as wages and welfare payments. This led to an increase on imported goods, especially food, to help German farmers and the buying up of company shares by the government to support deflation. Bruning returned the measures under Article 48 and dissolved the Riechstag; he then called an election, as he believed that it would return a majority for him. This was his first mistake, as it resulted in the Nazi party becoming the second largest party in the Riechstag; and this meant that Bruning could now only rule by decree, providing that the Social Democrats did not move against him. And Bruning knew that they would not as they were fearful of a Nazi take-over. Bruning remained in power until 1932 and by 1933 Hitler was Chancellor, yet in the 8 months between their reigns there were still to be 2 other Chancellors, von Papen and Schleicher. The extraordinary thing is, however, is the fact that both supported Hitler"s appointment and pushed Hindenburg into it, against his better judgment. It was von Papen"s belief that he could control Hitler like a puppet. This is an ideal political position, the idea is that you retain power and use somebody else as your public face. If things go badly, your own career and reputation remain intact.


cart/download

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:11
SD RM English

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
09:15
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:06
SD RM master

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung
08:59
SD RM German

Germany, Berlin

1933 – The takeover of Hitler: Machtergreifung

On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was officially sworn in as Chancellor in the Reichstag chamber with thousands of Nazi supporters looking on and cheering. In the March, 1933 elections the Nazis received 44 % of the vote. The party gained control of a majority of seats in the Reichstag through a formal coalition with the DNVP. After the Reichtag was set on fire (and the communists blamed for it) the Enabling Act gave Hitler dictatorial authority, passed by the Reichstag after the Nazis expelled the Communist deputies. Under the Enabling Act, the Nazi cabinet had the power to pass legislation just as the Reichstag did. The Act further specified that the cabinet could only approve measures submitted by the Chancellor (Hitler) and that it would lapse after four years time or upon the installation of a new government. The Enabling Act was dutifully renewed every four years, even during World War II.


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1934 - Mao Zedong: The long March
08:22
SD RM English

China

1934 - Mao Zedong: The long March

The Long March was a massive military retreat undertaken by the Chinese Communist Army to evade the pursuit of the Kuomintang army. The Communist Army of the Chinese Soviet Republic, led by Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, was on the brink of complete annihilation by Chiang Kai-Sheks troops in Jiangxi Province in October 1934. The communists escaped in circling retreat to the north, which ultimately covered some 8,000 km (4,960 miles) over 370 days. The route branched through some of the most difficult terrain of western China and arrived 9,600 km (5,952 miles) west, then north, to Shaanxi. (In 2003, Ed Jocelyn and Andrew McEwen retraced the route in 384 days and estimated it was actually about 6,000 km (3,700 miles) long.


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